Viewing entries in
Summer 2015

Arthritis Queensland

Who: Arthritis Queensland

When: Summer 2015

Where: Brisbane

Existing Code: https://github.com/Ryan-A-B/RHoK-n-the-Joint

RHoK helped AQ develop a tool called AQDA which allows GPs to more easily identify a dangerous form of inflammatory arthritis. Through consultations with GPs and specialist rheumatologists, they identified that the tool needed to be simple and effectively used in under 10mins. The AQDA asks a few quick questions about the patient’s history and symptoms and determines the likelihood the patient has inflammatory arthritis. The tool also provides the GP and patient with information resources and referral pathways. 

At the Brisbane Summer Hackathon 2015, the team were able to develop functioning and marketable MVP. The MVP works through four example questions then lands on a page in which it states the likely nature of the disease (inflammatory or  not) and lists specific conditions warranting further investigation.  By clicking on a condition listed, the MVP re-directs the user to our information sheets on each condition. There is also a button called “patient resources” which links to a library of patient education material. The “generate referral” button opens up a mock data base of specialists. Once a specialist is chosen, a word document is opened containing a blank referral template, which in the final product will be populated by the information provided by the questions.

Thanks to RHoK, Arthritis Queensland is now able to use the MVP to seek funding for the full product, with the potential to make a huge difference in the lives of people newly diagnosed with arthritis

Gifts 4 Good

Who: Gifts 4 Good

When: Winter 2015 and Summer 2015

Where: Brisbane

Website: http://www.gifts4good.org.au/

Gifts4Good is a social enterprise with a mission to connect online consumers, businesses and charities for the benefit of all.  RHoK assisted Gifts4Good with the development of a plugin for its online shopping platform at the Brisbane Winter Hackathon in 2015.  

6 months later, at the Brisbane Summer Hackathon 2015, a RHoK team prepared a pitch presentation for a new business stream selling charity experiences and group volunteering. And with focused and excellent teamwork, a prototype for a new online portal, Experiences4Good, was also developed over the weekend.

Help Me With It

Who: Help Me With It

When: Summer 2015

Where: Brisbane

Code: https://github.com/beauhankins/helpmewithit

The mission of Help Me With It is to connect individuals who need help to do one-off tasks with individuals who can volunteer their time to fix, clean, care, shop, transport, garden, sort, teach and more. There is no service like this in the not-for-profit sector. This is a digital disrupter in the social service and volunteering sectors. 

During RHOK, the Help Me With It team started to build a minimum viable product in Ruby on Rails. They used a Postgres back-end and ran it on Heroku. It was a good experience to help revise the functional and non-functional specifications for the platform and a great start to the build. 

Commons Sensor

Who: Commons Sensor

When: Summer 2015

Where: Western Sydney

Website: http://commons-sensor.openlocal.org.au/

This project launched by Western Sydney University's Institute for Culture and Society, and aims to build a database of objects that belong to “commons” - public property, creative commons, open source software, communal spaces. The specific initial focus is on Parramatta, and the hackathon challenge was to be to find some creative ways to visualise and imagine some of this data in ways that will engage the Parramatta public. At the Western Sydney Summer 2015 Hackathon the team began work on mapping items and places belonging to the commons in Parramatta.

Kolorob Bikkhon

Who: Kolorob Bikkhon

When: Summer 2015

Where: Western Sydney

Website: http://bikkhon.eresearch.ws/parra-kolorob-bikkhon/

In developing urban areas like the slums of Dhaka, Bangladesh, essential services like health, education, training, finance and employment can be difficult to find. They may not be registered, they may operate informally, or details about their locations, cost and operating hours may be inaccessible. Even though mobile and smartphone use is growing rapidly, location services like Google Maps or Open Street Maps provide only partial solutions. To address this, Save the Children is sponsoring an ambitious project called Kolorob in several slum areas. Through the project, communities are mapping different services, and the project is also developing an app to show where these services are and provide detailed information on them.

Our challenge was to tackle one specific part of this puzzle: how to navigate from A to B. We will be building upon existing routing services provided by OSM and try to handle some of the unpredictable routing challenges in informal settlements – no formal roads, frequent changes, walking only paths and narrow passageways that rickshaws can navigate, even if cars cannot. The team produced a working webpage which allows their partners in Dhaka to test multiple mapping algorithms against each other to see which work best for routing trips through the slums of Bangladesh. 

Darcy Street Project

Who: Darcy Street Project

When: Summer 2015

Where: Western Sydney

Code: https://github.com/RHendery/BaristaMentor/commits/master

Darcy St Project is a Parramatta based social enterprise that runs barista and coffee brewing training to the long-term unemployed. Western Sydney is a difficult place for young people looking to find work. The project was looking to build an app that assists with training, a kind of 'barista mentor' that helps people not only with the technicalities of making coffee, but also how to get ready for the hospitality job market. 

The team ended up with a working on a first prototype of an app (Barista Mentor) for training people from vulnerable populations in the basics of the theory they will need to get work in cafes. It emphasises video and interactive, gamified learning and social sharing. 

Small Connect

Who: Small Connect

When: Summer 2015

Where: Sydney

Code: https://github.com/RHoKAustralia/small-connect

SmallConnect.jpeg

Connecting young people to the community using free services available. The app is design to locate these services within the target area that young people want. The aim is to improve access and support for young people. To increase community participation and engagement within the community. 

"Small" has a metaphoric meaning. It means community and not-for-profit organisation. Small organisations make a huge impact in the community. Using the theme 'small' and ' connect' we wanted to use small services and put them together to make a huge impact. 

The hackathon was a great experience. Steve my partner in crime on developing Small Connect has been great and continues to be that. We kept everything simple and realistic based on the amount of time we had. We worked on the time-frame. discuss openly what our objectives were and made sure that the app is accessible to everyone, not just young people.

Watch Me Grow

Who: Watch Me Grow

When: Summer 2015

Where: Sydney

Existing code: https://github.com/RHoKAustralia/watch-me-grow

WatchMeGrow.jpeg

Developmental and behavioural difficulties presenting in early childhood pose a significant disease burden with lifelong consequences. In this regard, 20 to 25% of children at start of school are “developmentally vulnerable"". The goal of Watch Me Grow is to give every child (in NSW initially and then across Australia) the opportunity for early identification. Capitalising on the high uptake of the immunization program, we hope to provide a simple and effective tool to GPs and other health professionals to do developmental checks during vaccination visits.

At the RHoK Summer 2015 Hackathon we were able to design a demo web app to be used using a link to trial initially as a research project enabling parents and GPs to use the webapp with the aim of identifying those children who display “red flags” based on parental concerns and then be guided through the correct pathway using standardised tools and an algorithm for further assessments and referrals. This diagnostic app will have a significant impact as early identification and intervention significantly improves the outcomes for both children and their families.

Right Click Community

Who: Right Click Community

When: Summer 2015

Where: Melbourne

Facebook Page: https://www.facebook.com/rightclickcommunity/

Existing Code: https://github.com/RHoKAustralia/rightclick-ios.git

RightClickCommunity.jpg

Right Click Community is a social enterprise that runs tech classes for seniors, taught by teenagers. It aims to bridge the generational divide while helping seniors find supportive, non-judgemental technology help at a price they can afford. They aim to be a sustainable community program that will run using the pay what you can business model. This will allow them to cover costs, pay their teen volunteers and ensure that all seniors will be able to participate in a class or drop by to have a tech question answered.

At the Summer 2015 Melbourne Hackathon RHoK volunteers helped them develop an IOS app that functions as a notetaker. It allows teens to take photos of each step they are showing their senior - on any device - and create a set of visual, digitally annotated notes that they can send to a wireless printer or email right away. We also put together a web application back-end to the app which will collect important metrics about how teens teach the seniors, what questions are most common and how long each session runs for. This app and back end is going to allow Right Click to be so much more effective. Seniors will remember what they have been taught and the organisers will be able to monitor what strategies the teens are using that are most effective. They will also now be equipped with metrics and data about their successes that will help them greatly in grant applications and forging new partnerships with local communities. 

FoodUP!

Who: FoodUP!

When: Summer 2015

Where: Melbourne

Website: http://www.foodupsite.wordpress.com.au/

Code: https://github.com/RHoKAustralia/melb-foodswapp

FoodUp! is community project based on a social enterprise model to create food conscious communities. We aim to create and empower urban centres to promote local food production, reduce food waste and develop community in their neighbourhoods. RHoK helped us at the Melbourne Summer 2015 Hackathon to design a minimum viable product and begin the app development process of our food sharing app.  Our app will help empower local and backyard growers of fruit and veggies to connect with individuals, food bank, cafes and businesses to ensure fresh food is redistributed and used throughout the community. In a nutshell, its "Facebook meets Tinder for Cabbages!".

At the Melbourne 2015 Summer Hackathon RHoK volunteers assisted with the design and user flow of our app and we were able to narrow down our app to a minimum viable product of only 6 screens! We also were able to start a website, listserve, and begin prototyping the app.

Responsible Cafes

Who: Responsible Cafes

When: Summer 2015

Where: Sydney

Code: https://github.com/RHoKAustralia/responsible-cafes

ResponsibleCafes.jpeg

The Responsible Cafes Program aims to build a community of Responsible Cafes and Responsible Consumers, with a common goal of reducing single-use waste. The initial priority is to reduce the more than 1 billion single-use coffee cups and lids that get wasted in Australia every year. Following that, we will encourage and assist the community in upgrading their sustainability practices in areas as diverse as replacing single-use straws and packaging, composting and waste reduction, renewable energy and responsible finance. 

After considering how we could maximise the impact of the Responsible Cafes Program and streamline the user and administrative experience, our amazing team spent a large portion of the hackathon developing a slick member signup and member cafe profile framework that will really showcase all the wonderful cafes out there who are helping to curb single-use waste. This framework will also allow for the ongoing collection of waste reduction data so that we can track waste reductions over time. This is still a work in progress for RHoLL's and hopefully subsequent RHoK's. In addition, we were able to put some great pieces of work straight into production with an extensive FAQ section and blog added to our existing website, as well as some cosmetic changes to improve the UX. 

i.pee.freely

Who: i.pee.freely

When: Summer 2015

Where: Melbourne

Website: http://changingplaces.org.au/

Code (WP-Plugin): https://github.com/RHoKAustralia/i.pee.freely-wpplugin

Code (API): https://github.com/RHoKAustralia/i-pee-freely-api

I_Pee_Freely.jpg

This project aimed to change the current Changing Places website so that people with disabilities (and their families/carers) could provide feedback on the existing Changing Places toilets and provide data around where they would want to see more fully accessible toilets built in the future. This would then provide the Changing Places campaign with the information we need to ensure the current facilities were being used, but also the data to lobby councils, shopping centres, and other facilities to build more Changing Places, knowing that there is a demand for them and they would be used.

At the hackathon it was discovered that while the existing website had some limitations, it remained the best way to collect this information, so additional mapping and data collection tools were commenced and prototyped. These provided a smooth interface to find out more information about the facilities than is currently provided, provide feedback on those facilities, and list a recommended location for new facilities where they didn’t exist. Through having a person with a disability there, the team’s UX experts were also able to identify some improvements that could be made regarding the overall usability of the Changing Places website, and a new design was created.

Local Linguist

Who: Local Linguist

When: Winter 2015 and Summer 2015

Where: Melbourne

Code: https://github.com/RHoKAustralia/melb-timor-leste

Local Linguist is an app for collecting data on local languages. The idea was inspired by the problems encountered with linguistics research in East Timor. For the majority of children in the country, the language used in the classroom is not the language that they speak at home, and for many, not a language they have spoken before starting school.

The Local Linguist app and website is designed to allow researchers to upload picture, audio and written data sets to a website. These sets can then be used by researchers who have the local linguist app on their phone. The app allows researchers to go into the field, show informants a picture, or written question, or hear an audio clip, and then get the informant to respond using a multiple choice answer, written answer, or recorded audio answer. The app then prompts field researchers to upload the data to the website. This app has the potential to revolutionise linguistic (and other) research in places such as Timor-Leste. 

The prototype app was developed at the RHoK Melbourne Winter 2015 Hackathon. Further development occurred over a number of RHoLLs, and again at the RHoK Melbourne Summer 2015 Hackathon. The team is currently worked on the website database (using ruby on rails), updating the app (the app is written in java), and linking the app to the database. 

Maker Network

Who: Maker Network

When: Winter 2015 and Summer 2015

Where: Melbourne

Code: https://github.com/RHoKAustralia/melb-maker-map

MakerNetwork.jpg

Tracey Nguyen is a final year student at RMIT studying a Masters in Design Innovation and Technology. Her research into Melbourne's maker culture revealed a lack of connectivity between all types of makers, and spaces supporting makers around Melbourne and its neighbouring communities. So she approached RHoK to see if we could help develop a way of connecting maker spaces to each other and the wider community. 
 
During the Melbourne 2015 Winter Hackathon the team was able to leverage her original work on a maker map prototype and replaced the backend of an existing open source system for robustification of data source, providing a platform for growth. Options were added for resource sharing of materials and skills. The team came back for the Summer 2015 hackathon, where they made some further improvements, and future plans are in place for a clearer categorisation of resources, and the integration of other platforms for events and content. Sum